Tag Archives: watermark

Create a Watermark In Gimp

Today I want to show you how to create a watermark in Gimp to protect your copyrighted work. For the example I’ll use one of the tiles from my first graphic pack that I put up for sale. I needed a watermark to protect the sample graphics that can be seen here.

This is real simple to do and using Gimp we can achieve this in about 4 simple steps. NOTE: I tried to highlight all the buttons and tools that you will have to use. For the final steps I combined the opacity and rotate tool. If your new though, you can just mouse over the buttons to find out what they are. Just click on images to enlarge.

bg-fractal-5-spaceFirst download and load the trippy psychedelic fractal graphic above in Gimp. Once the tile is loaded you want to create a new layer and make sure that transparency is checked. If you like the graphic, click here for information on use.

psyWatermark1Now select a font. I chose Sans Bold, I wanted to use something kind of chunky. And change your color to white and make the font size about 60px. Then click on the tile and type Sample. Note: If Gimp creates a font layer for you, some versions will, just delete the unused transparent layer.

psyWatermark2Now click on the rotate tool. Then click on the Sample text and rotate till its going across the tile  from corner to corner. You may want to use the move tool to center it. Just click on the move tool then click directly on the text and move it into position.

psyWatermark3Finally, click on the opacity and bring it down to about 30 or whatever you think looks good. The goal is to make it not look overly annoying and not completely kill the design.

funky psychedelic trippy background tile.

Finished product will look something like this.

That’s it, you’re done ! Click file, save, export as filename.jpg and your sample watermark is finished. You could also use a transparent svg file in whatever color you wanted as the overlay and then slide the opacity for the svg to get the same effect only in a design instead of text. I may do that in another tutorial down the road.

To see this effect in use click here.

 

Create a Color Changing Copyright Signature Brush in Gimp

I’m not really sure the exact direction the blog is going to take. I plan on creating a compendium of all things graphic design, web design, and probably photography related as well. I also want a place to showcase the work of new-aeon-design.com. This afternoon I thought about doing a picture a week of some different photography produced here. Although I’ve posted images all over the internet with out a copyright signature, I thought now that I have the domain I should probably sign and copyright every image posted here. Then I thought , if I do that I may as well post my first Gimp tutorial. So, today I will teach you how to create a Copyright Signature brush to use on all your designs, and photography.

barn.

This is an image of a barn at rest area found just outside of Ellicotivlle N.Y.

I’m using Gimp2.8 for this tutorial, however if you use Photoshop, or any of the other programs out there you can probably follow along and make this work.

First thing you want to do is load up Gimp2.8 and go to FILE ,CREATE NEW.

Set the width to 300 and height to 200.

Click on ADVANCED OPTIONS, change COLOR SPACE to GREYSCALE and Fill BACKGROUND COLOR. By default it should be set to white.o.k.

Now for the copyright symbol you want to find a character map. I’m pretty sure every operating system comes with one of these pre installed. I use Linux with KDE and used KcharSelect. In Windows I think there is a character map in accessories. If you’re using KDE just open up your terminal program, type kcharselect, and the program should open for you. Now , once you have your character map open, search for the Ⓒ symbol and copy it to clipboard.

Return to Gimp, click on the TEXT TOOL, select your font, and type your signature into your work space. Then click to the beginning of the text and paste the copyright symbol at the beginning of your signature. Highlight all the text in the text box, size it to your desired size, at the top of your window click IMAGE, AUTOCROP IMAGE. We’re almost done.

Now we want to save the file as a .gbr file and place the file in the Gimp brushes folder. This will very from system to system depending on how you have yours set up. On my computer it’s in the home/username/.gimp2.8/brushes folder. So at the top of the window go to FILE, click on EXPORT, and then save it to /home/username/.gimp2.8/brushes/ and export it as signature.gbr which will save the file and make it a gbr or brush file for you.

Now click refresh button found at the bottom of the brushes dialog box and the brush should appear. Open up a new photo, create a new transparent layer, adjust your brush size and try out your new copyright signature brush ! Happy Photographing !