Create a Watermark In Gimp

Today I want to show you how to create a watermark in Gimp to protect your copyrighted work. For the example I’ll use one of the tiles from my first graphic pack that I put up for sale. I needed a watermark to protect the sample graphics that can be seen here.

This is real simple to do and using Gimp we can achieve this in about 4 simple steps. NOTE: I tried to highlight all the buttons and tools that you will have to use. For the final steps I combined the opacity and rotate tool. If your new though, you can just mouse over the buttons to find out what they are. Just click on images to enlarge.

bg-fractal-5-spaceFirst download and load the trippy psychedelic fractal graphic above in Gimp. Once the tile is loaded you want to create a new layer and make sure that transparency is checked. If you like the graphic, click here for information on use.

psyWatermark1Now select a font. I chose Sans Bold, I wanted to use something kind of chunky. And change your color to white and make the font size about 60px. Then click on the tile and type Sample. Note: If Gimp creates a font layer for you, some versions will, just delete the unused transparent layer.

psyWatermark2Now click on the rotate tool. Then click on the Sample text and rotate till its going across the tile  from corner to corner. You may want to use the move tool to center it. Just click on the move tool then click directly on the text and move it into position.

psyWatermark3Finally, click on the opacity and bring it down to about 30 or whatever you think looks good. The goal is to make it not look overly annoying and not completely kill the design.

funky psychedelic trippy background tile.

Finished product will look something like this.

That’s it, you’re done ! Click file, save, export as filename.jpg and your sample watermark is finished. You could also use a transparent svg file in whatever color you wanted as the overlay and then slide the opacity for the svg to get the same effect only in a design instead of text. I may do that in another tutorial down the road.

To see this effect in use click here.

 

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